mona gazala

visual artist

What Remains

Hugh N. Ronald Gallery, Portland, IN             June 2 - July 7, 2017

Second Sight Project, Columbus, OH                      July 15 - August 1, 2017 

Solo exhibition that examines the aesthetics and politics of abandonment and gentrification through the remnants of Franklinton's Bellows School. The struggle between  preservation and progress - what is to be discarded and who decides? - is an analogy for how we perceive the people in marginalized neighborhoods.

Exhibition made possible in part through the generous funding of the Greater Columbus Arts Council.

                   

        

Bunker Projects Residency

Bunker Projects, Pittsburgh, PA

March 6 - April 3, 2017

In a continuing study of shifting narratives from power dynamics and conflicts in different "homelands," the artist explores colonialism and dominance, and the immutable relationship of all forms of oppression.

 

Common Objects

Union Street Gallery, Chicago, IL

February 22 - March 25 - , 2017

 

Group exhibition re-examining the common object, things we see in everyday life or objects that we could not do without. Artists will provide a lens for the viewer to see these objects with a new or different perspective.

 

 

Politics & Power

Ann Street Gallery, Newburgh, NY

October 8 - November 26, 2016

This exhibition will focus on bringing together various perspectives on representations of Politics & Power in visual culture, while examining issues of political or social change and their effect on our current societal struggles.

 

 Fragmented Histories

Solo exhibition. Using objects/artifacts and historical tableaux, this body of work touches on displacement and marginalization issues, both personal and societal, which stem from conflicts in the Middle East as well as in the economically-segregated cities of the United States.

Columbus Cultural Arts Center

January 15 - February 12, 2016

This exhibition was made possible in part through the generous funding of the Puffin Foundation West.

 

Artist statement:

My name is Mona Gazala. I am an American-born artist of Palestinian descent. My work is informed by a heritage rooted in places with great archaeological significance. My parents, while growing up in Palestine, Jordan and Egypt, used to live right alongside major archaeological digs, and played on the ruins of thousand-year-old palaces and citadels. My artistic practice connects the urban decay and reconstruction in Cleveland and other rust belt cities, with the endeavors of an archaeologist to rediscover and preserve lost beauty and lost worlds. It elevates that which we consider blight, discarded and undesirable to beautiful, significant and valuable.

While my work pays homage to iconic archaeological imagery and museum environments, it is driven also by a need to address modern-day social issues. Poverty, displacement, and gender inequality are among some of the divisive forces that bely the elemental beauty of urban ruins. 

My artistic practice is one of mainly installation art, social practice art and social sculpture; I currently run an artist residency in a once-vacant house in inner-city Columbus Ohio, and am looking forward to receiving funding to expand this program so that it can benefit both the artists seeking an affordable place to live and work, and the neighborhood where 27% of the houses are vacant or abandoned and in need regrowth that is sensitive to the long-time residents.
My name is Mona Gazala. I am an American-born artist of Palestinian descent. My work is informed by a heritage rooted in places with great archaeological significance. My parents, while growing up in Palestine, Jordan and Egypt, used to live right alongside major archaeological digs, and played on the ruins of thousand-year-old palaces and citadels. My artistic practice connects the urban decay and reconstruction in Cleveland and other rust belt cities, with the endeavors of an archaeologist to rediscover and preserve lost beauty and lost worlds. It elevates that which we consider blight, discarded and undesirable to beautiful, significant and valuable.

While my work pays homage to iconic archaeological imagery and museum environments, it is driven also by a need to address modern-day social issues. Poverty, displacement, and gender inequality are among some of the divisive forces that bely the elemental beauty of urban ruins. 

My artistic practice is one of mainly installation art, social practice art and social sculpture; I currently run an artist residency in a once-vacant house in inner-city Columbus Ohio, and am looking forward to receiving funding to expand this program so that it can benefit both the artists seeking an affordable place to live and work, and the neighborhood where 27% of the houses are vacant or abandoned and in need regrowth that is sensitive to the long-time residents.
My name is Mona Gazala. I am an American-born artist of Palestinian descent. My work is informed by a heritage rooted in places with great archaeological significance. My parents, while growing up in Palestine, Jordan and Egypt, used to live right alongside major archaeological digs, and played on the ruins of thousand-year-old palaces and citadels. My artistic practice connects the urban decay and reconstruction in Cleveland and other rust belt cities, with the endeavors of an archaeologist to rediscover and preserve lost beauty and lost worlds. It elevates that which we consider blight, discarded and undesirable to beautiful, significant and valuable.

While my work pays homage to iconic archaeological imagery and museum environments, it is driven also by a need to address modern-day social issues. Poverty, displacement, and gender inequality are among some of the divisive forces that bely the elemental beauty of urban ruins. 

My artistic practice is one of mainly installation art, social practice art and social sculpture; I currently run an artist residency in a once-vacant house in inner-city Columbus Ohio, and am looking forward to receiving funding to expand this program so that it can benefit both the artists seeking an affordable place to live and work, and the neighborhood where 27% of the houses are vacant or abandoned and in need regrowth that is sensitive to the long-time residents.
My name is Mona Gazala. I am an American-born artist of Palestinian descent. My work is informed by a heritage rooted in places with great archaeological significance. My parents, while growing up in Palestine, Jordan and Egypt, used to live right alongside major archaeological digs, and played on the ruins of thousand-year-old palaces and citadels. My artistic practice connects the urban decay and reconstruction in Cleveland and other rust belt cities, with the endeavors of an archaeologist to rediscover and preserve lost beauty and lost worlds. It elevates that which we consider blight, discarded and undesirable to beautiful, significant and valuable.

While my work pays homage to iconic archaeological imagery and museum environments, it is driven also by a need to address modern-day social issues. Poverty, displacement, and gender inequality are among some of the divisive forces that bely the elemental beauty of urban ruins. 

My artistic practice is one of mainly installation art, social practice art and social sculpture; I currently run an artist residency in a once-vacant house in inner-city Columbus Ohio, and am looking forward to receiving funding to expand this program so that it can benefit both the artists seeking an affordable place to live and work, and the neighborhood where 27% of the houses are vacant or abandoned and in need regrowth that is sensitive to the long-time residents

I am an American-born artist of Palestinian descent. My artwork is informed by a heritage rooted in places of great archaeological significance, and by a lifetime spent growing up in the post-industrial Midwest.  

The artwork I construct makes lyrical connections between the decay and renewal of our post-industrial rust-belt cities and the endeavors of the archaeologist to rediscover and preserve lost beauty and lost worlds. In the process, it often elevates that which we consider blight, discarded and undesirable to something of greater significance.

While paying homage to iconic historical imagery and the vernacular of museum displays, my art is also driven by a need to address modern-day social issues. Poverty, displacement, racial and gender inequality are some of the divisive forces that bely the elemental beauty of the ruinous urban landscape.

My artistic practice is one of mainly installation art, socially-engaged art and social sculpture. My most ambitious work to date is the Second Sight Project, an artist residency program run in once-vacant and disused houses in inner-city Columbus Ohio. Activating this space in a neighborhood where 25% of the houses are vacant or abandoned, this is an experiment that seeks to advocate for both the artists seeking an affordable place to live and work, and for the neighborhood which is in need of a regrowth that is in harmony with the needs of its long-time residents.

 


While my work pays homage to iconic archaeological imagery and museum environments, it is driven also by a need to address modern-day social issues. Poverty, displacement, and gender inequality are among some of the divisive forces that bely the elemental beauty of urban ruins. 

My artistic practice is one of mainly installation art, social practice art and social sculpture; I currently run an artist residency in a once-vacant house in inner-city Columbus Ohio, and am looking forward to receiving funding to expand this program so that it can benefit both the artists seeking an affordable place to live and work, and the neighborhood where 27% of the houses are vacant or abandoned and in need regrowth that is sensitive to the long-time residents

 Contact artist at: mona.gazala@gmail.com